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FIND A PLANT CAMPUS LANDSCAPE FEATURES WHAT'S IN BLOOM CAMPUS TOURS

Geology Tour by Department of Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

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Lambert Fieldhouse - Fossiliferous Limestone (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Limestone is a sedimentary rock which can form in one of two ways: by being chemically precipitated from water or by the build-up of the hard parts of marine organisms. Fossiliferous limestone is of the second category. Certain marine organisms, such as coral, remove calcium carbonate from their watery environment to make the hard parts of their bodies. When the marine organisms die, these hard par

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Granitic Foliated Gneiss (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Gneiss is a metamorphic rock formed by changing schist, granite, or volcanic rocks through intense heat and pressure. Gneiss is foliated, which means that it has layers of lighter and darker minerals. These layers are of different densities and come about as a result of the intense pressure used to form gneiss. Gneiss is made up of coarse-grained minerals such as quartz and feldspar. Granitic gneis

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Amphibolite with Granitic Inclusions (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

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Hovde Hall - Limestone Pillars and Granite Steps (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Limestone is a popular material to use in the construction of buildings. Its weight prevents it from being used in construction of extremely tall buildings, but it is easy to cut into blocks and will stand up well to exposure. Indiana is the source of most of North America’s limestone. Granite is also a popular construction material, but it is used mainly in items such as flooring tiles, kitchen

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Granite Gneiss (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

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Granite Gneiss/Schist (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Gneiss is a metamorphic rock formed by changing schist, granite, or volcanic rocks through intense heat and pressure.

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Granite (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Granite is an intrusive igneous rock formed deep in the earth.

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Metaconglomerate (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Metaconglomerates are conglomerates that have experienced some metamorphism. Conglomerates are detrital sedimentary rocks, meaning they were formed from the weathered remains of other rocks. Conglomerates are mainly composed of rounded gravel-sized particles held together with certain minerals, usually clay minerals or quartz. The intense heat and pressure of metamorphism might slightly deform the

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Granite Gneiss (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Gneiss is a metamorphic rock formed by changing schist, granite, or volcanic rocks through intense heat and pressure. Gneiss is foliated, which means that it has layers of lighter and darker minerals. These layers are of different densities and come about as a result of the intense pressure used to form gneiss. Gneiss is made up of coarse-grained minerals such as quartz and feldspar. Granitic gneis

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Hornfels (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Hornfels is a metamorphic rock formed by a special type of metamorphism called contact metamorphism. This means that a rock (clay rich in this case) comes into contact with an igneous intrusion so the rock heats up but no pressure is exerted. Because of this, hornfels is nonfoliated; there is no pressure to force the minerals into layers. Hornfels can vary widely in both appearance and mineral comp

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Fountain-High Grade Gneiss Amigmalite (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

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Chert Breccia (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

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Amphibolite with Granite Inclusions (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

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Gneiss (Campus Features and Green Initiatives)

Gneiss is a metamorphic rock formed by changing schist, granite, or volcanic rocks through intense heat and pressure. Gneiss is foliated, which means that it has layers of lighter and darker minerals. These layers are of different densities and come about as a result of the intense pressure used to form gneiss. Gneiss is made up of coarse-grained minerals such as quartz and feldspar.

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FIND A PLANT CAMPUS LANDSCAPE FEATURES WHAT'S IN BLOOM CAMPUS TOURS

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